The Photoacoustic Effect

How does Photoacoustics work? Here's an infographic that explains photoacoustics using the Vevo LAZR-X.

Photoacoustic Effect


The principal of the photoacoustic effect is simple. Nanosecond pulsed laser light is used to illuminate the tissue. Chromophores such as hemoglobin and red blood cells absorb the light which causes local heating and thermoelastic expansion. Pressure or sound waves are emitted and detected by our ultra high frequency transducers. These signals are the processed into high resolution, co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic images.

The Photoacoustic Effect explained:

1. LIGHT EMITTED:
Nanosecond pulsed laser light is emitted causing illumination of the tissue.

2. LIGHT ABSORBED:
The light is absorbed by chromophores causing thermoelastic expansion.

3. SOUND EMITTED:
Soundwaves are emitted and detected by the ultra high frequency transducer.

4. SIGNALS PROCESSED:
The signals are then processed and registerd as high resolution ultrasdound and photacoustic images.



Benefits of Photoacoustic Imaging with the Vevo LAZR-X

  • Deep, optical signals visible with high resolution and in real-time
  • Multispectral acquisition for imaging multiple components simultaneously
  • Non-invasive for longitudinal studies
  • Co-registration with detailed ultrasound anatomical images
  • Real-time assessment of functional data such as oxygen saturation, contrast agent distribution, pharmacokinetics and more
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